Erendira Still from video
Erendira Still from video
C0015.00_05_33_15.Still013.jpg
Teomama

This piece is titled Teomama, which in Nahuatl means “God Carrier” it was the name given to our medicine men and women who carried the bones of Huitzilopochtli from Aztlan to Tenochtitlan, present day Mexico City.

A few of you might recognize this composition, it is the image on the Mexican flag, an image of a prophecy. The Teomamas carried the medicine bundles for 200 years down into Anahuac valley waiting for a sign and it was when they reached lake Texcoco they finally saw it. An eagle eating a snake on a prickly pear cactus, a union of sky and earth, so they knew it was safe to build their city here. And so they did, on the lake.

In this piece I act as the Teomama, carrying the female hawk on my back and I am Tenochtitlan, the land, my garment and hair disappear into the water and the light reflected on it. Melissa K. Nelson, an Anishinaabe cultural ecologist talks about the Native Woman’s body that in so many stories acts as a kind of meeting place, a contact zone, between the human and more-than-human life which establishes an ethic of kinship between my body, the water and the sky. My ancestors long understood the abject was a tool for accessing the sublime. In this piece Im the Cuauhxicalli, the offering stone, the one who holds the heart cut from the sacrificed. This is a hawk, eating a quail and it is a blood transfusion to the cosmos. This is not the nature we want to see. But the earth is hungry.

With thanks to Ashley Davis, Preston Lowe and Cheri of Baywings Falconry

Descent into Mictlan2.jpg
Nagualism
2017_Spider Woman.jpg
2017_Greed.jpg
Spider Woman 2.jpg
Teomama

This piece is titled Teomama, which in Nahuatl means “God Carrier” it was the name given to our medicine men and women who carried the bones of Huitzilopochtli from Aztlan to Tenochtitlan, present day Mexico City.

A few of you might recognize this composition, it is the image on the Mexican flag, an image of a prophecy. The Teomamas carried the medicine bundles for 200 years down into Anahuac valley waiting for a sign and it was when they reached lake Texcoco they finally saw it. An eagle eating a snake on a prickly pear cactus, a union of sky and earth, so they knew it was safe to build their city here. And so they did, on the lake.

In this piece I act as the Teomama, carrying the female hawk on my back and I am Tenochtitlan, the land, my garment and hair disappear into the water and the light reflected on it. Melissa K. Nelson, an Anishinaabe cultural ecologist talks about the Native Woman’s body that in so many stories acts as a kind of meeting place, a contact zone, between the human and more-than-human life which establishes an ethic of kinship between my body, the water and the sky. My ancestors long understood the abject was a tool for accessing the sublime. In this piece Im the Cuauhxicalli, the offering stone, the one who holds the heart cut from the sacrificed. This is a hawk, eating a quail and it is a blood transfusion to the cosmos. This is not the nature we want to see. But the earth is hungry.

With thanks to Ashley Davis, Preston Lowe and Cheri of Baywings Falconry

Erendira Still from video
C0015.00_05_33_15.Still013.jpg
Teomama
Descent into Mictlan2.jpg
Nagualism
2017_Spider Woman.jpg
2017_Greed.jpg
Spider Woman 2.jpg
Teomama
Erendira Still from video
Teomama

This piece is titled Teomama, which in Nahuatl means “God Carrier” it was the name given to our medicine men and women who carried the bones of Huitzilopochtli from Aztlan to Tenochtitlan, present day Mexico City.

A few of you might recognize this composition, it is the image on the Mexican flag, an image of a prophecy. The Teomamas carried the medicine bundles for 200 years down into Anahuac valley waiting for a sign and it was when they reached lake Texcoco they finally saw it. An eagle eating a snake on a prickly pear cactus, a union of sky and earth, so they knew it was safe to build their city here. And so they did, on the lake.

In this piece I act as the Teomama, carrying the female hawk on my back and I am Tenochtitlan, the land, my garment and hair disappear into the water and the light reflected on it. Melissa K. Nelson, an Anishinaabe cultural ecologist talks about the Native Woman’s body that in so many stories acts as a kind of meeting place, a contact zone, between the human and more-than-human life which establishes an ethic of kinship between my body, the water and the sky. My ancestors long understood the abject was a tool for accessing the sublime. In this piece Im the Cuauhxicalli, the offering stone, the one who holds the heart cut from the sacrificed. This is a hawk, eating a quail and it is a blood transfusion to the cosmos. This is not the nature we want to see. But the earth is hungry.

With thanks to Ashley Davis, Preston Lowe and Cheri of Baywings Falconry

Nagualism
Teomama

This piece is titled Teomama, which in Nahuatl means “God Carrier” it was the name given to our medicine men and women who carried the bones of Huitzilopochtli from Aztlan to Tenochtitlan, present day Mexico City.

A few of you might recognize this composition, it is the image on the Mexican flag, an image of a prophecy. The Teomamas carried the medicine bundles for 200 years down into Anahuac valley waiting for a sign and it was when they reached lake Texcoco they finally saw it. An eagle eating a snake on a prickly pear cactus, a union of sky and earth, so they knew it was safe to build their city here. And so they did, on the lake.

In this piece I act as the Teomama, carrying the female hawk on my back and I am Tenochtitlan, the land, my garment and hair disappear into the water and the light reflected on it. Melissa K. Nelson, an Anishinaabe cultural ecologist talks about the Native Woman’s body that in so many stories acts as a kind of meeting place, a contact zone, between the human and more-than-human life which establishes an ethic of kinship between my body, the water and the sky. My ancestors long understood the abject was a tool for accessing the sublime. In this piece Im the Cuauhxicalli, the offering stone, the one who holds the heart cut from the sacrificed. This is a hawk, eating a quail and it is a blood transfusion to the cosmos. This is not the nature we want to see. But the earth is hungry.

With thanks to Ashley Davis, Preston Lowe and Cheri of Baywings Falconry

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